December 2011

December 28, 2011

For more than a century, US foreign policy was based on the principle of non-intervention in overseas wars and disputes, and rejection of “entangling alliances.” In the 1890s this gave way to an expansionist, imperialistic and “messianic” foreign policy. Big business interests craved new markets overseas, sensationalist newspapers promoted military adventurism, and political and religious leaders sought to spread US-style “democracy” and “Christianity.” In 1898 the US — seizing on a pretext — declared war against Spain. The US acquired the Philippines and Puerto Rico, and used the occasion to take Hawaii and establish hegemony over Cuba. This was a landmark transition from a republic to an imperial power. Later, in two world wars, Presidents Wilson and Roosevelt vigorously pushed a globalist US foreign policy, justifying military intervention everywhere in the name of “democracy.” Today America’s “exceptionalist” role as a “world policeman” is increasingly resented everywhere as arrogant and hypocritical.

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December 21, 2011

The Christmas message of peace, good will and respect for others is not just a Christian or even narrowly religious one. These timeless principles are important for nations as well as for individuals. But because American cultural and political life is controlled by a small but powerful minority with its own partisan agenda, US foreign policy has all too often been arrogant, bellicose and oppressive — with harmful long-term consequences for Americans and humanity. Due to the systematic misinformation about history and current affairs in the US many American Christians are woefully ignorant about their own religion and heritage, including basic facts about the Holy Land. Americans are encouraged to turn their backs on fellow Christians in the Holy Land, and are persuaded to instead identify with and support their oppressors.

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December 14, 2011

Nothing more vividly underscores the depths to which American political life has fallen than the behavior of leading presidential candidates at a recent meeting of the “Republican Jewish Coalition.” They sought to outdo each other in bidding for support from the single most powerful and influential ethnic-religious group in the US. Such self-serving behavior is not new, but has long been an expression of the corruption of American political life. In 1947-48, President Harry Truman faced the choice of whether or not to support the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Secretary of State Marshall, along with all other knowledgeable US officials, warned that support for Zionist ambitions in the Middle East would have harmful, long-term consequences for America and the world. But Truman ignored these warnings. By supporting the new Jewish state, he put partisan political considerations foremost. This fateful decision was the “original sin” of US Middle East policy.

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December 7, 2011

Republican presidential candidates (with the notable exception of Ron Paul) and other prominent politicians boast of their belief in “American exceptionalism.” This is more than “feel good” talk. Such rhetoric is used as a pretext or justification for otherwise inexcusable policies that actually harm America and the world. Most of the world understandably regards such talk as dangerously arrogant and foolish. It’s no coincidence that the politicians who talk the loudest about “American exceptionalism” are also the most craven in their pandering to Jewish-Zionist power and vehement in their support for Israel. Americans are not inherently more virtuous or “freedom loving” than other peoples. America’s extraordinarily rapid rise, and its prosperity and eminence during the twentieth century, are due to objective historical factors, which are no longer as relevant as they were in the past.

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